General Interest Music Books

(Updated 25 March 2017)

This section contains books of interest to all musicians and that do not fit into other categories. Look here for books on the mental and physical health of musicians, reference books, music history, acoustics, and more.  (Music of a general nature which is not limited to one instrument or instrument family is on the General Music page.) Books are in alphabetical order by title.

You may search for a title, author, or any other text on this page by
using the Edit menu Find command (shortcut Ctrl+F or Mac Command+F).

Books marked "New!" in gold type are new publications.  Books marked "New!" in teal type are new to our stock.
G140: The A to Z of Foreign Musical Terms by Christine Ammer. ECS Publishing, 1989, PB, 128 pages. This book gives the English equivalents of 3,000 musical terms primarily from French, German, Italian, and Spanish. They were collected from more than 30,000 scores. A guide to French, German, and Italian pronunciation is also included.
10.75
G073: The Amateur Wind Instrument Maker by Trevor Robinson. University of Massachusetts Press, PB, 116 pages. Guidance for the amateur craftsman who wishes to make wind instruments. The book includes the flute, fife, recorder, clarinet, shawm, oboe, krumhorn, rackett, cornetti, trumpets, and horns.
16.95
G002: Anatomy of the Orchestra by Norman Del Mar. University of California Press, PB, 528 pages. A comprehensive guide to the orchestra for conductors, musicians, students and everyone interested in the performance of orchestral music. The book is divided in to sections by type of instruments: The Strings, The Woodwind, Horns, The Heavy Brass, Timpani and Percussion, and Keyboard and Other Instruments. Each section goes into considerable detail about each instrument including characteristics, range, etc. The book concludes with an extensive index.
34.95
G207: An Annotated Guide to Wind Chamber Music for Six to Eighteen Players  by Rodney Winther. Warner Bros Publications (Alfred), 2004, PB, 448 pages. This thick book has a great deal of information, which is enhanced by the paragraph or more of description of each of the more than 500 compositions. It is organized by the number of players and within each sized ensemble by instrumentation. It also includes wind music with soloist(s) and with voices. Helpful indexes will assist the reader.
39.95
G049: An Anthology: The Writings of Josef Marx compiled and edited by Gloria Ziegler. McGinnis & Marx, 1983, PB, 160 pages. Josef Marx (1913-1978) was a renowned oboist, musicologist, music publisher and teacher. This is a selection of his articles, liner notes, and a lecture from the 1950s through the 1970s.
11.95
G042: Arnold Jacobs: Song and Wind by Brian Frederiksen, edited by John Taylor. WindSong Press, 1996, HB, 276 pages. With a career spanning seven decades with the Indianapolis, Pittsburgh and Chicago Symphonies, Arnold Jacobs earned a reputation as a world-class performer. Equally significant are his teachings, especially on breathing.  This book was  written by Mr. Jacobs' assistant, Brian Frederiksen and draws on material from masterclasses, private interviews, previously published writings and contributions from his students and colleagues.
29.95
G032: The Art of Wind Playing by Arthur Weisberg. Meredith Music, 1975/2007, PB, 145 pages. The author, who was a renowned bassoonist, has written this book because of his concern that winds lack the traditions and the consistent pedagogy of string and keyboard instruments. Topics include dynamics, intonation, articulation, vibrato, technique, breathing, musicianship, and interpretation. An essential reference for all wind musicians.
19.95
G022: The Athletic Musician, A Guide to Playing without Pain by Barbara Paull and Christine Harrison. Scarecrow Press, 1997, PB, 175 pages. An excellent book for all instrumental musicians co-written by a physiotherapist and a violinist. It includes detailed but easy to understand guidance on both what to do and what not to do. Main sections cover the problem of musician's injuries, anatomy and applied anatomy for musicians, and the musician as athlete. 
44.95
G038: Audition Success by Don Greene. Routledge, 2001, PB, 168 pages. Turn good auditions into great ones with Audition Success. Master audition coach Don Greene, Ph.D. techniques teach you how to monitor and control fear, and put your nervous energy to work. The beginning performer will find here the tools to prepare for the audition circuit, and the experienced performer will appreciate techniques that can turn good auditions into great ones.
26.95
G017: The Book of Klezmer by Yale Strom. A Cappella Books, Chicago, 2002, HB, 381 pages. This book by klezmer musician and author Yale Strom covers the entire history of klezmer and is based on both written sources and more than 50 research trips the author made to Eastern Europe between 1981 and 1999. The chapters are: From King David to Duvid the Klezmer, From the Enlightenment to the Holocaust, Klezmer in the New World 1880-1960, and From Zev to Zorn: The Masters of Culture (the klezmer revival). Appendices are Klezmer Memories in the Memorial Books, Klezmer Slang, and Klezmer Tunes. The book includes photographs, both old and taken during the author's research trips.
27.95
G030: A Brahms Reader by Michael Musgrave. Yale University Press, 1999, PB, 344 pages.  This engaging account of the life of Johannes Brahms provides a fuller portrait of the German composer than ever before. Eminent Brahms scholar Michael Musgrave draws on a wide array of documentation to illuminate Brahms's personality; his outlook as a composer; his activities as pianist, conductor, scholar, and traveler; his friendship with Robert and Clara Schumann; and much more.
26.95
G050: The Cambridge Companion to Bach edited by John Butt. Cambridge University Press, 1997, PB, 341 pages. The Cambridge Companion to Bach goes beyond a basic life-and-works study to provide a late-twentieth-century perspective on J. S. Bach the man and composer. Benefiting from the insights and research of some of the most distinguished Bach scholars, this Companion covers cultural, social and religious contexts, surveys and analyzes Bach's compositional style, traces his influence, and considers the performance and reception of his music through the succeeding generations.
30.95
G051: The Cambridge Companion to Mozart edited by Simon P. Keefe. Cambridge University Press, 2003, PB, 309 pages. Bringing the most recent scholarship into the public arena, this volume bridges the gap between scholarly and popular images of Mozart, enhancing the  readers' appreciation of Mozart and his extraordinary output. Part I situates Mozart in the context of late eighteenth-century musical environments and trends that played a pivotal role in his development and examines his methods of composition. Part II surveys his works in an the genres in which he excelled and Part III looks at the reception of the composer and his music since his death. Part IV offers insight into Mozart's career as a performer as well as perspectives on historically informed performances of his music.
31.95
MT01: The Cambridge Companion to the Musical edited by William A. Everett and Paul R. Laird. Cambridge University Press, 2002, PB, 327 pages. An accessible survey of one of the most popular forms of musical performance. Written especially for students and theatergoers, it offers a guide to the history and development of the musical in England and America, and worldwide. Starting with the early history of the musical, the volume examines the latest works and innovations, and includes information on the singers, audience and critical reception, and traditions. The book contains a chronology, reading lists and photos from key productions. Sale Price.
23.95
G058: The Cambridge Companion to the Orchestra edited by Colin Lawson. Cambridge University Press, 2003, PB, 297 pages. This up to date guide to the orchestra and orchestral life combines orchestral repertory history with critical thought. It includes topics such as the art of orchestration, score reading, conducting, international orchestras, the historical instrument movement, recording, and becoming an orchestral musician, educator or informed listener.Click on the book cover to view the table of contents.
34.95
G131: Circular Breathing: a Method by Robert S. Spring. Windplayer Publications, 2006, SS, 31 pages. This book presents two alternative introductory methods of circular breathing. It also features exercises and advice from seven contributing experts for flute (Robert Dick), clarinet (Robert Spring), saxophone (Donald Lefevre), bassoon (Jeffrey Lyman), oboe (Martin Schuring), trumpet (Josef Burgstaller), and low brass (Samuel Pilafian), including recommended repertoire for each.  Note:  We are out of this book. The publisher's website which we used for ordering is still there but not functioning.
G045: Circular Breathing for the Wind Performer by Trent P. Kynaston. Warner Bros. Publications, SS, 20 pages. This is a guide to learning circular breathing for all wind instrumentalists. The author discusses breathing and then provides instruction in beginning, intermediate and advanced techniques for circular breathing. 
10.95
G091: Classical & Romantic Performing Practice 1750-1900 by Clive Brown. Oxford University Press, 1999, PB, 676 pages. Brown identifies areas in which musical notation conveyed rather different messages to the musicians for whom it was written than it does to modern performers, and seeks to look beyond the notation to understand how composers might have expected to hear their music realized in performance. There is ample evidence to demonstrate that, in many respects, the sound worlds in which Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner, and Brahms created their music were more radically different from ours than is generally assumed.
72.95
G062: The Compleat Klezmer by Henry Sapoznik. Tara Publications, 1987, PB, 80 pages. This book is the definitive Klezmer anthology. It includes a short history of klezmer music, notes and observations on the theory and performance of klezmer music,  33 annotated melodies, a discography and bibliography, resources, and more. Click on the book cover to view the table of contents.
19.95
G023: Encyclopedia of Scales, Modes and Melodic Patterns for All Instruments by Arnie Berle. Mel Bay, 1997, SS, 96 pages. This book provides a comprehensive source for many types of scales. It also provides recommendations on how to practice scales and a practice routine. Click on the book cover to view the table of contents.
17.95
G054: For the End of Time, The Story of the Messiaen Quartet by Rebecca Rischin. Cornell University Press, 2003 (2006), PB, 175 pages. NEW PAPERBACK EDITION. The author, clarinet professor at Ohio University, has written a comprehensive history of the composition and premiere of the Quartet for the End of Time (Quatour pour la fin du Temps) which took place in German camp for French prisoners of war in January, 1941. Based on extensive interviews and documentary research, it examines the events that lead to the composition, the experiences of the musicians in the camp, the composer's interpretive preferences, and the musicians' problems in execution and how they affected the premiere and subsequent performances. The paperback edition includes a new Appendix C with additional information. The music is also available: Quartet for the End of Time (Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps).
24.95
G035: The French Noel - With an Anthology of 1725 Arranged for Flute Duet by Betty Bang Mather & Gail Gavin. Indiana University Press, 1996, PB, 120 pages. French noels unite sacred and profane texts, music, and dance as performed from the late Middle Ages through the Baroque. Part I of The French Noel discusses the history and uses of the form, suggests appropriate dance steps, and examines its musical and poetic style. Part II consists of 16 Christmas songs first published in 1725. Betty Bang Mather and Gail Gavin have transcribed these charming pieces with lyrics of the period so that they may be either sung or played. The volume is enhanced by several facsimile pages from the original publication and reproductions of contemporaneous paintings showing noels being performed. 
22.95
G004: Fundamentals of Musical Acoustics by Arthur H. Benade. Dover, PB, 596 pages. The Second, Revised Edition originally published in 1976. This is a hefty book with enough detail for a physicist but still rewarding to the layman. It includes about 75 pages specifically devoted to woodwinds.
19.95
G052: Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue by David Schiff. Cambridge University Press, 1997, PB, 132 pages. The Rhapsody in Blue (1924) established Gershwin's reputation as a serious composer and has since become one of the most popular of all American concert works. In this richly informative guide David Schiff considers the piece as musical work, historical event and cultural document. He traces the history of the Rhapsody's composition, performance and reception, placing it within the context of American popular song and jazz and the development of modernism. He also provides a full account of the different published and recorded versions of the work and explores the many stylistic sources of Gershwin's music.
27.95
G112: Guide to Klezmer Arranging and Orchestration by Peter Sokolow. Tara Publications, 1991, SS, 41 pages. Included in this books are invaluable hints on setting up an arrangement, instrument combinations, phrasing, notation, vocal background writing, historical performance practices, and sound "basics" of klezmer theory and orchestral writing, complied and annotated in an organized, concise way by an experienced klezmer veteran.
19.95
G070: A Guide to the Understanding and Correction of Intonation Problems by Al "Corky" Fabriozio. Meredith Music Publications, 1994, SS, 30 pages. This book could be titled: How to Tune the Wind Ensemble. It provides details such as pitch tendencies and tuning strategies for the principal wind ensemble instruments, a tuning method for the entire ensemble, and acoustical considerations by instrument of various chords (which could be turned into an exercise).
12.95
G009: The Harper Collins Dictionary of Music by Christine Ammer. HaperCollins, PB, 3rd edition, 512 pages. This completely revised and updated edition of the popular HarperCollins Dictionary of Music is a valuable reference tool for students, professionals, and music lovers alike. More then just a book of simple definitions, it provides in-depth explanations and examples of over 3,500 musical terms and includes over 250 illustrations to help clarify the entries.
21.95
G010: The Historical Performance of Music, An Introduction by Colin Lawson and Robin Stowell. Cambridge University Press, PB, 219 pages. This book offers students and performers a concise overview of historical performance. Chapters include: Music as History, The application of primary sources, Changes in Musical Styles, Conditions and Practices, Case Studies in Ensemble Music (Bach: St. Matthew Passion BWV 244, Mozart: Serenade for 13 Instruments K361, Berlioz: Episode de la vie d'un Artiste, Symphonie Fantastique en cinq parties Op. 14, Brahms: Symphony No. 2 in D. major Op. 73), and The Continuing Debate.
21.95
G056: How to Succeed in an Ensemble by Abram Loft. Amadeus Press, 2003, HB, 300 pages. The author was a member of the Fine Arts Quarter for 25 years and later chairman of the string department at the Eastman School of Music. This book is both an personal account of what life is really like in a chamber ensemble and advice on both the artistic and business aspects of creating and sustaining a successful chamber group.
24.95
G005: Horns, Strings, and Harmony by Arthur H. Benade. Dover, PB, 271 pages. An outstanding non-technical introduction to acoustics by Dr. Benade who was a physicist, flutist, and science educator. The book covers vibrating systems, the role of the human ear in hearing music, how pianos, violins, trumpets, oboes, clarinets, flutes, saxophones and many other instruments work. In addition,  the author provides instructions for building a home made trumpet, clarinet, and flute.
12.95
G033: How to Learn the Alexander Technique by Barbara Conable. Andover Press, Third Edition, 1995, PB, 154 pages.  A primer for students of the Alexander Technique, a well-known method for improving freedom and ease of movement and physical coordination. This book provides the first authoritative account of William Conable's concept, Body Mapping, the study of how our ideas about our bodies affect our experience and movement. Includes sections aimed at instrumentalists, vocalists, actors and dancers.
21.50
G006: The Inner Game of Music by Barry Green and W. Timothy Gallwey. Doubleday, HB, 225 pages. The Inner Game of music is that which takes place in the mind, played against such elusive opponents as nervousness, self doubt, and fear of failure. Using the same principles of "natural learning" Timothy Gallwey developed so successfully for tennis, golf and skiing and applying them to his own field, noted musician Barry Green shows how to acknowledge and overcome these internal obstacles in order to bring a new quality to the experience and learning of music. There are also chapters on ensemble playing, improvisation, composition and creativity, and listening skills - an essential part of the Inner Game - are discussed throughout.
24.95

G046: Instrument Repair for the Music Teacher by Burton Stanley. Alfred Publishing Co., 1978, PB, 154 pages. A bit dated, perhaps, and more detailed than the name suggests, this book provides instructions for the most common repair procedures for woodwind and brass instruments. The primary focus is on clarinet, flute, piston valve brass, rotary valve brass, and trombone. Corking the saxophone neck is covered but not saxophone repadding.
22.95
G178: The Jazz Language: A Theory Text for Jazz Composition and Improvisation by Dan Haerle. Alfred Publishing Co., 1980, PB, 58 pages. This text presents all of the materials commonly used by the jazz musician in a logical order dictated both by complexity and need. Some of the material is more useful to the writer or arranger while other material may be more valuable for the improviser. The book is primarily focused on chords and scales, but also includes brief sections on harmonization and improvisation. The book is not intended to be either an arranging or improvisation text, but merely a reference providing the information musicians need to pursue any activity they wish.
17.95
G216: The Jazz's Musician's Guide to Creative Practicing by David Berkman. Sher Music Co., 2007, SB, 154 pages + CD. In this book, NY pianist and recording artist David Berkman shows you how to make practicing interesting and enjoyable by breaking problems into manageable tasks that you can easily master. The Jazz Musician's Guide To Creative Practicing covers many of the things you need in order to be a complete jazz musician, including: basic jazz theory, clearly explained, how to make scale and arpeggio practicing fun and relevant to playing tunes, how to effectively add chromatic approach notes and upper structure triads to your solo lines, How to practice tunes like "Body And Soul" and "Giant Steps" or rhythm changes and get better at the whole tune by mastering individual aspects of it, how to improve your ability to swing, to play in odd meters and to play with different rhythmic feels, and how to play fast without losing your ability to make the notes sing. The CD is of David demonstrating many of the ideas presented.
28.95
G011: Lexicon of Musical Invective, Critical Assaults on Composers Since Beethoven's Time by Nicolas Slonimsky. Norton, PB, 325 pages. With a new forward by Peter Schickle. This legendary book is an anthology of critical assaults on well-known composers and their works. Here the reader will find biased, unfair, ill-tempered, and singularly unprophetic judgments by musicians and reviewers. An example: I am bound to say that dreary though most musical humour is, Strauss's is the dreariest that has ever bored me. I contemptuously dismiss Till Eulenspiegel as a pretentious piece of mart shoddy. (J.F. Runciman, Saturday Review, London, May 2, 1896)
14.95
G143: Messiaen by Peter Hill and Nigel Simeone. Yale University Press, 2005, HB 352 pages. Based upon unprecedented access to Messiaen’s private archive granted to the authors by the composer's widow, Yvonne Loriod-Messiaen, Peter Hill and Nigel Simeone trace the origins of many of Messiaen's greatest works and place them in the context of his life, from his years at the Paris Conservatoire and his passionate first marriage to Claire Delbos through the immense achievements of his final decades. A beautiful and well illustrated book.
47.95
G053: Messiaen - Quatour pour la fin du Temps by Anthony Pople. Cambridge University Press, 1998, PB, 115 pages. This book is a comprehensive guide to the Quartet for the End of Time by Olivier Messiaen (1908-92). It covers the origin of the work in a prisoner-of-war camp in 1940-41 and has an in depth assessment of each of its eight movements. The music is also available: Quartet for the End of Time (Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps).
32.95
G179: Music Notation: Scores and Parts by Matthew Nicholl and Richard Grudzinski. Berklee Press, 2007, PB, 153 pages. Whether you notate music by hand or use computer software, this practical reference will show you today's best practices for how to render the details of your scores and parts. Improve your music's legibility and express your ideas clearly to get the best possible representation of your music. You will learn to: create scores that are easy to conduct and parts that are easy to perform; understand the unique practices and standards for handwritten vs. computer-generated scores, such as those by Finale® and Sibelius; lay out scores with proper instrument order, measures per page, and common alignment practices; understand the publication standards for orchestral, big-band, vocal, and rhythm-section–based scores; use appropriate practices for different styles, such as pop, commercial, classical, and jazz; master the details of setting notation elements such as measure numbers, rehearsal markings, chord symbols, dynamics, lyrics, and many more; and use specialized notation, such as measure repeats, col, slashes, hits over time, and others.

16.95
G020: Music, Physics and Engineering by Harry F. Olson. Dover, 1967, PB, 460 pages. A wide ranging book covering both the mechanical and electronic areas of sound production and reproduction. Topics covered include sound waves, musical terminology, resonators and radiators, musical instruments and their characteristics, properties of music, acoustics (theater, studio, and room), sound-reproducing systems, and electronic music.  Many charts, diagrams and equations are included. While many aspects of this book are quite technical, most of the information will be comprehensible to all musicians. 
16.95
G029: Musical Performance, A Guide to Understanding edited by John Rink. Cambridge University Press, 2002, PB, 245 pages. This book unravels the complexities of playing music and reveals aspects of learning, playing and responding to music relevant to performances of all levels. A survey of performance through the ages leads to a presentation of basic historical, analytical and psychological concepts. Four chapters follow on teaching, development, practice and memorization. The next section considers the "translation" from score to sound, physical projection, ensemble playing and performance anxiety. The final section addresses the act of listening, the legacy of recordings, music criticism and "performers on performance".
34.95
G047: Musical Wind Instruments by Adam Carse. Dover, 2002, PB, 381 pages. An unabridged republication of this work originally published in London in 1939. A comprehensive guide to wind instruments used in European orchestras and in military and other wind bands during the preceding 400 years. Includes flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, trumpets, cornets, horns, trombones, bugles, and related instruments. Illustrated with photos and drawings.
16.95
G024: New Directions in Music, Seventh Edition by David Cope. Waveland Press, 2001, PB, 259 pages. Directions in the musical avant-garde in the past fifty years seem as numerous and diverse as the composers and their works. Yes these directions have historical motives and aesthetic values, traceable and uniquely observable due to their singularly radical nature. Building on previous editions, this book explores the history, philosophy, composers, and works of the avant-garde since the late 1940s. Musicians and musical scholars of all levels with benefit from the author's clear presentation, organizing a disparate field into a logical succession of ideas and developments.
49.95

G039: The New Langwill Index, A Dictionary of Musical Wind-Instrument Makers and Inventors
by William Waterhouse. Tony Bingham, 1993, HB, 555 pages. Based on the work of Lyndesay Graham Langwill, this book is an entirely new edition rather than a revision of his last work. The primary purpose of this volume is to assist in the identification, dating and evaluation of wind instruments. It also provides some information on the careers and achievements of makers and inventors. A first class book in every way. Because of the weight of this book, Media Mail (bookrate) shipping charges will be based on the actual cost of postage.
124.95
G063: Note Grouping by James Morgan Thurmond. Meredith Music Publications, 1981, PB, 144 pages. Subtitled: A Method for Achieving Expression and Style in Musical Performance. Fully explains through musical example, the concept of expressive musicianship as taught by Anton Horner, William Kincaid and Marcel Tabuteau. This book clearly illustrates how to teach students to play or sing with expression, musicianship and style and will help to make your performances “come alive.” Here in print are exactly the concepts I was taught by Robert Shaw and Julius Herford...it has had a profound influence upon music education everywhere! Weston H. Noble, Director of Music Activities, Luther College
34.95
G021: On the Sensations of Tone by Hermann Helmholtz. Dover, 1954, PB, 576 pages. This is an unabridged reprinting of the 1885 translation by Alexander J. Ellis of the last German edition of Die Lehre von den Tonempfundungen. It includes a new introduction written in 1954. On the Sensations of Tone is regarded as one of the world's greatest scientific classics. It bridges the gap between the natural sciences and music theory. The first two parts of the book deal with the physics and physiology of music. The last part contains the author's theory on the aesthetic relationship of musical tones.
22.95
G095: Orchestral Music, A Handbook by David Daniels. Scarecrow Press, Fourth Edition, 2005, HB, 627 pages. The recent forth edition of this book, much larger in format then the third edition. Expanded to 6400 entries and almost 900 composers (only 4200 in 3rd Ed.). Merged with the American Symphony Orchestra League's OLIS (Orchestra Library Information Service). Enhanced specific information on woodwind & brass doublings. Lists of required percussion equipment for many works. New, more intuitive format for instrumentation. More contents notes and durations of individual movements. Composers' citizenship, birth and death dates and places, integrated into the listings. If you need to know the instrumentation and the publisher(s) of orchestral works this book is essential.

Because of the weight of this book, Media Mail (bookrate) shipping charges will be based on the actual cost of postage.
66.95
G025: Ornamentation, A Question & Answer Manual by Valery Lloyd-Watts and Carole L. Bigler. Alfred Publishing Co. Inc., 1995, SS, 64 pages. An excellent and inexpensive introduction to ornamentation. Written to help all musicians, regardless of instruments, it presents a logical step-by-step procedure that makes realizing an ornament and integrating it into a performance simple, stimulating, and rewarding. Covers the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary eras. 
10.95
G007: The Oxford Dictionary of Music by Michael Kennedy and Joyce Bourne. Oxford University Press, HB, 985 pages. A new edition of the most comprehensive one volume music dictionary available, compiled by one of the world's foremost music authorities. With over 12,000 entries, the dictionary's coverage is exceptional. It is distinguished from the other dictionaries on this page by the inclusion of information on musicians, composers, and musical works. Written to appeal to general readers as well as musicians and musicologists, it is an indispensable addition to any reference shelf. (Special Order. Please email us if you want to order. Price subject to change.)
54.95
G055: Performance Success by Don Greene. Routledge, 2002, PB, 151 pages. Performance anxiety is a fact of life for all musicians. You can deny the problems of stress in performance or you can face them, even learn to embrace them. Performance Success teaches a set of skills so that a musician can be ready to go out and sing or play at his or her highest level, working with energies that might otherwise be wasted in unproductive ways. This is a book of skills and exercises, prepared by a master teacher.
30.95
G144: Practicing Successfully, A Masterclass in the Musical Art by Elizabeth A. H. Green. Gia Publications, 2006, HB, 147 pages. With a Reflection by Rebecca Ericsson Hunter. In Practicing Successfully, legendary music educator Elizabeth A. H. Green draws upon her decades of experience instructing students of all levels to break down the practicing regimen into a logical learning sequence. In Part One, she suggests isolating difficult musical passages so they become instantly manageable using rhythmic motifs, scales, accentuations, and etudes. In Part Two, experts on various instruments discuss recurring problems and how to defeat them. In the concluding Part Three, Green notes the physiological principles pertaining to practice and suggests ways to modify practice sessions to reflect these facts. She writes, "Ultimate success depends upon one immutable, inescapable, and well-publicized fact: the musician has to practice successfully or not."
23.95
G134: Psychology for Musicians by Andreas C. Lehmann, John A Sloboda, and Robert H. Woody. Oxford University Press, 2007, HB, 268 pages. Subtitled: Understanding and Acquiring the Skills. Examining the processes that underlie the acquisition of musical skills, the authors provide a concise, accessible, and up-to-date introduction to psychological research for musicians. They explore common traits between skilled activities in non-musical domains and particular musical behaviors such as sight-reading, improvisation, performing from memory, and composing. With these comparisons in mind, they examine how the skills needed to teach, perform, and even listen to music are acquired and honed over time. The book is divided into three sections: Musical Learning, Musical Skills, and Musical Roles.
29.95
G048: Science & Music by Sir James Jeans. Dover, 1968, PB, 258 pages. An unabridged republication of the 1937 English edition of this classic book on musical sounds. It conveys precise information in a non-technical way for anyone interested in music. Includes the various means of producing sounds, hearing, scales, intonation, types of tuning, the concert hall, orchestras and many more topics.
12.95
G008: Schirmer Pronouncing Pocket Manual of Musical Terms edited by Theodore Baker, Nicolas Slonimsky, and Laura Kuhn. Schirmer, PB, 362 pages. This is a small (3 inches by 4 inches), extremely useful, and inexpensive reference. Includes elements of notation, notes and rests, the staff, clefs, scales, chromatic signs, intervals, keys, chords, time signatures, rules for pronouncing German, French, and Italian, a comparative table of tempo marks, musical terms (263 pages), and noteworthy musicians (76 pages).
5.95
G071: Selected Audition Masterclasses. Windplayer Publications, 2004, SS, 32 pages. Written by 15 top experts (such as Don Greene and Barry Green) who work throughout the music field, this book starts with techniques that help you overcome your first audition jitters and continues with how you can be better prepared for any audition in the music field, including the country's leading orchestras. No matter what instrument you play. You'll even learn how players are able to get professional jobs without performing an actual audition!
15.95
G043: Slonimsky's Book of Musical Anecdotes by Nicholas Slonimsky. Routledge, 2002, PB, 320 pages. Let Slonimsky regale you with tales of Mozart, Beethoven, Rossini and the other expected Classical Music figures, the ugly ducking of Russian music, the Kafka of modern music and other sublime misfits. First published in 1948, this book has earned well-deserved acclaim for being insightful, witty and enthralling. Charming illustrations by Robert Bonotto complete this superb collection of musical vignettes. Great for bedside reading, a gift, or a source for information to enliven a music history class.
35.95
G028: A Soprano on Her Head by Eloise Ristad. Real People Press, 1982, PB, 204 pages. Eloise Ristad deals here with complex problems which torment and cripple so many of our most creative and talented people, and she does so with compassion, wisdom, and wit. The problems of stage fright and other petty and debilitating fears are a suffering of epidemic proportions in our society, and involve modalities of thought and projections that rob spontaneity and enthusiasm in artistic performance. A Soprano on Her Head supplies answers and methods for overcoming these universal psychological blocks--methods that have not only been proven in her own studio, but which trace back through history to the oldest and wisest systems of understanding the integration of mind and body.
16.50
G169: Songs and Chants without Words, Book 1 by Edwin Gordon, Beth Bolton, Wendy Hicks, and Cynthia Taggart. GIA Publications, 1993, SS, 91 pages. The booklet is part of The Early Childhood Music Curriculum, but given the complexity of some of the the rhythms and meters, appears to be much more useful for high school and college sight singing training. It includes 109 short songs without words and 74 chants (rhythms only). They are cross indexed by tonality and meter. 
12.95
G040: The Structures and Movement of Breathing by Barbara Conable. Gia Publications, 2000, SS, 48 pages. While this book is subtitled: "A Primer for Choirs and Choruses," it is also very useful for players of wind instruments. It provides clear and concise information about breathing and features dozens of detailed illustrations and explanations. This book is based on the technique of Body Mapping.
7.95
G044: Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns by Nicolas Slonimsky. Amsco Publications, PB, 244 pages. Originally published in 1947, this book is a reference book of scales and melodic patterns. It is primarily a resource for composers, but instrumentalists have also found it useful as a source for ideas in jazz and as exercises for modern classical music.
29.95
G057: Treatise on Vocal Performance and Ornamentation by Johann Adam Hiller, edited and translated by Suzanne J. Beicken. Cambridge University Press, 2001, PB, 199 pages. Hiller's Treatise on Vocal Performance and Ornamentation was published in Germany in 1780 and is an important manual on vocal technique and performance in the eighteenth century. This present edition, translated with an introduction and extensive commentary by musicologist Suzanne J. Beicken, makes the treatise available for the first time in English. With its emphasis on practical aspects of ornamentation, declamation and style it will be valuable to instrumentalists as well as singers and is a significant contribution to the understanding of performance practice in the eighteenth century. Also very valuable to instrumentalists performing music of this period.
44.95
G072: The Well-Tempered Announcer, A Pronunciation Guide to Classical Music by Robert A. Fradkin. Indiana University Press, 1996, PB, 255 pages. In this innovative guide, Robert Fradkin provides the pronunciation of over 2000 personal names, titles of works, and musical terms. In addition, at least half the book is devoted to general pronunciation guidelines for both familiar and unfamiliar languages, giving the reader the tools to pronounce words which are not listed.
32.95
G235: Tuning for Wind Instruments by Shelley Jagow. Meredith Music Publications, 2012, PB, 120 pages. The most complete intonation resource for band directors and anyone interested in tuning. It includes the origin of pitch tuning standards. Understanding when to apply equal tempered vs. just tempered tuning. How to calculate the proper harmonic ratios for fine-tuning chords. It identifies the best tuning notes and gives tuning procedures for each instrument. It lists more than 70 tuning truths and myths. In addition, this book includes intonation charts for tracking personal progress, along with extensively researched color-coded fingering charts for the most used wind instruments providing pitch tendencies and suggestions for alternate fingerings.
24.95
G034: What Every Musician Needs to Know about the Body by Barbara Conable. Andover Press, 2000, SB, 101 pages. A book about Body Mapping and the kinesthetic sense and how they can be developed in ways that help musicians play well. It is full of information about the Alexander Technique, but it is very useful for people who don't have access to an Alexander teacher as well. Heavily illustrated.
23.50
G019: You Are Your Instrument by Julie Lyonn Lieberman. Huiksi Music, New York, 1991, printing of 1997, PB, 152 pages. This book is a detailed guide to mind and especially the body of the musician. It provides guidance to help musicians heal existing injuries and develop a more enjoyable physical/mental experience during practice and performance. It includes anatomy charts and 19 pages of illustrated exercises.
19.95
G059: The Young Musician's Survival Guide by Amy Nathan. Oxford University Press, 2000, PB, 128 pages. Subtitled Tips from Teens & Pros, this book will help young people cope with difficulties involved in learning a new instrument and remaining dedicated to playing and practicing. Teens from renowned music programs join pro musicians such as Wynton Marsalis, Paula Robison, and James Galway in offering practical answer to questions from what instrument to play to where the musical road may lead. Probably most suited for ages 11-14 and may also be useful to music teachers who teach this age group.
9.95

Bindings:  HB: Hard Bound,  PB: Perfect Bound (paperback with square spine),  SS: Saddle Stitch (paper, folded and stapled),  SB: Spiral Bound (plastic or metal)